Stir-fried Pork with Ginger and Spring Onions

pork stir fry with ginger and spring onion

It’s cold and it’s January, and if like me you lived Christmas and New Year to the max, waistlines will have grown and wallets shrunk. Oh well, I regret nothing and can’t wait to do it again this year! What I tend to do every January is eat healthy home-cooked food, which is quick to make and easy on my bank balance, and snaps everything back into shape.

My delicious pork stir-fry with ginger, spring onions and black pepper is as easy to make as it is to eat. Pork loin is a wonderfully tender cut of meat to use in a stir-fry and it is great value as well. The pork soaks up all the flavour of the ginger and spring onions, and the rather generous amount of ground black pepper gives it a good fragrant heat. This is fast stir-frying and tastes awesome!

pork stir fry with ginger and spring onion

Stir-fried Pork with Ginger and Spring Onions

Serves 4

2 tbsp. groundnut oil
550g/1lb 4oz pork fillet, finely sliced
5cm/2 inch ginger, finely sliced into matchsticks
6 spring onions, finely sliced
1 tsp. finely ground black pepper
2 tbsp. fish sauce
3 tbsp. oyster sauce

Rice or noodles to serve

  1. Heat the wok over a high heat until smoking. Pour in the oil and swirl it around the wok. Add the pork and spread it out in a layer and leave it for 1 ½ – 2 minutes to sear and go golden on one side, then stir-fry for 2-3 minutes to take on a little more colour.
  2. Chuck in the ginger, spring onions, black pepper, fish sauce and oyster sauce and continue to stir fry for 5-6 minutes, or until the pork is cooked through and tender and the sauce clings lovingly to the meat. Serve immediately with sticky rice or noodles.

Goes really well with my fried noodles and bok choy

-all thoughts and spelling mistakes are mine-

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Super Fast Moroccan Prawn Couscous

This super fast prawn couscous is my take on a classic Moroccan couscous dish, with a bit of a pilaf vibe thrown into the mix. The recipe is perfect for a delicious mid week supper. It uses lots of store cupboard ingredients so you can whip it up in no time. Some onion, garlic and spices fried off, then couscous and prawns, both of which cook really fast, are thrown in and finished off with a shower of almonds and pumpkin seeds.

I have been known to get such bad Hanger (No this is not a spelling mistake. It is an actual word – fact! Hunger and Anger together at last – Hanger!) that I have made the recipe in under 10 minutes using cooked prawns!

I hope you enjoy this wicked little recipe as much as I do – let me know what you think.

Serves 2

2 tbsp. olive oil
1 red onion, roughly sliced
2 cloves garlic, roughly sliced
3 bay leaves
6 cardamom pods
1 tsp. cumin seeds
1 dry chilli, broken into 4 pieces
60g/21⁄4oz/1⁄3 cup couscous
1 tsp. cinnamon powder
250g/9oz raw peeled king prawns
1 preserved lemon, pith removed and skin finely sliced
1 tbsp. tomato puree
1 tbsp. flaked almonds
1 tbsp.  pumpkin seeds
Sea salt

1. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onions and stir-fry for 3-4 minutes until just turning soft. Chuck in the garlic, bay leaves, cardamom pods, cumin seeds and dry chilli. Mix well and cook for another 30 seconds, until fragrant.

2. Meanwhile pour the couscous into a mixing bowl and sprinkle in the cinnamon powder and good pinch of salt. Mix well to avoid getting clumps of cinnamon in the couscous.

3. Tip the prawns, preserved lemon skin and tomato puree into the pan with the onion. Mix everything together really well and scatter in the couscous. Pour over 90ml/3fl oz/generous 1/3 cup of just boiled water, give a good mix, cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer gently for 6-7 minutes, or until the prawns are cooked through and the couscous has absorbed all the liquid. Remove the lid and cook for another 1-2 minutes so that the couscous can dry out.

4. To serve the dish, fluff the couscous using a fork and divide between 2 serving plates. Scatter over the almonds and pumpkins seeds and serve immediately.

– All thoughts and spelling mistakes are mine –